Maryland State Panel Approves Survey For Offshore Wind | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Maryland State Panel Approves Survey For Offshore Wind

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The slow push towards offshore wind power in Maryland continues.
Michal Sacharewicz: http://www.flickr.com/photos/onnufry/2965410770/
The slow push towards offshore wind power in Maryland continues.

A state panel in Maryland has approved a $3.3 million contract to conduct a survey related to developing wind power off the coast of Ocean City, according to the Associated Press.

The Board of Public Works approved the contract Wednesday with Coastal Planning & Engineering for a high-resolution geophysical survey.

The money for the contract will come from about $30 million the state of Maryland received in a settlement agreement with Exelon Corp. last year in its bid to takeover Baltimore's Constellation Energy.

Gov. Martin O'Malley's proposals to develop offshore wind have stalled in the last two regular sessions of the Maryland General Assembly. A scaled-back version passed the House of Delegates last year, but did not clear the state Senate.

O'Malley is expected to try again this year.

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