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Lawsuit Over Virginia Woman's Online Comments Deemed Unjustified

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Virginia's Supreme Court is reversing a judge's order that a Fairfax County woman must remove negative comments about a home contractor that she posted online.

Virginia's highest court is reversing a judge's order that a Fairfax County woman must remove negative comments about a home contractor that she posted online, reports the Associated Press.

Jane Perez was sued over the comments she posted about Dietz Development.

She posted a harsh review of the D.C. firm on Yelp and Angie's List, citing shoddy work and implying the contractor stole items from her home. Dietz is claiming that the poor review cost the company about $300,000 in business.

Last month, a judge ordered Perez to delete the accusations and barred her from repeating them in new posts while the lawsuit was pending.

The state Supreme Court tossed out the preliminary injunction, saying it wasn't justified and didn't specify the time that it would be effective.

The Virginia chapter of the American Civil Liberties Union and Public Citizen had appealed the judge's order saying it violated free speech rights.

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