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Congressman Jim Moran Explains Opposition To Fiscal Cliff Deal

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Rep. Jim Moran says he is disappointed with the compromise struck by Democratic leaders over the fiscal cliff.
David Schulz
Rep. Jim Moran says he is disappointed with the compromise struck by Democratic leaders over the fiscal cliff.

While all of the region's Republicans opposed the deal to avert the fiscal cliff, most of the area's Democrats got in line with the plan.  There were a few, however, who chose to break ranks.

No one got all they wanted in the last minute deal to avoid another recession, but Northern Virginia Congressman Jim Moran was one of 16 Democrats who couldn't swallow the compromise. He says he's disappointed his party leaders lowered taxes on estates and changed the threshold for income taxes.

"Now there's no leverage left," Moran says. "Except perhaps the bully pulpit, but the bully pulpit that the president has doesn't seem to have much resonance with the ideologically oriented majority of the House Republicans."

Moran says with revenue streams decided he now fears Republicans will try to slash the deficit with budget cuts alone.

"When people talk about shrinking the size of government, they're talking about weakening the economy of the Washington area."

Virginia Democrat Bobby Scott also opposed the deal.

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