Hillary Clinton Hospitalized With Blood Clot After Concussion | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Hillary Clinton Hospitalized With Blood Clot After Concussion

Secretary of State Hillary Clinton has been admitted to a hospital for a blood clot "stemming from" a concussion earlier this month, Clinton spokesman Philippe Reines says. In a statement, Reines says doctors found the clot during a follow-up exam on Sunday.

"She is being treated with anti-coagulants and is at New York-Presbyterian Hospital so that they can monitor the medication over the next 48 hours," he says.

Clinton had been expected to return to work this coming week. CBS News reports:

"Aides and doctors say Clinton contracted a stomach virus in early December and became dehydrated, then fainted, fell and hit her head. She was diagnosed with a concussion on Dec. 13 and hasn't been seen in public since."

Update at 9:20 p.m. ET. Many, Many Miles:

NPR's Michele Kelemen tells our Newscast Desk that Clinton is the most-traveled secretary of state. An interactive on the State Department website shows that Clinton has logged more than 949,000 miles.

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