NPR : News

Filed Under:

Remembering Gen. Schwarzkopf, 'Military Hero Of His Generation'


Army Gen. Norman Schwarzkopf, right gets a ceremonial sabre from Cadet First Capt. Douglas P. McCormick of Harrisburgh, Pa., on Wednesday, May 15, 1991 cadet brigade review at the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, NY. Schwarzkopf died Dec. 27.
(AP Photo/Ron Frehm)
Army Gen. Norman Schwarzkopf, right gets a ceremonial sabre from Cadet First Capt. Douglas P. McCormick of Harrisburgh, Pa., on Wednesday, May 15, 1991 cadet brigade review at the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, NY. Schwarzkopf died Dec. 27.

The death Thursday of retired Gen. H. Norman Schwarzkopf — "Stormin' Norman" — has prompted many looks at the legacy of the American commander who led coalition forces during Operation Desert Storm in 1991, which pushed Saddam Hussein's Iraqi Army out of Kuwait.

Schwarzkopf was 78. He:

-- "Presided over the swift and devastating 1991 military assault on Iraq that transformed the Middle East and reminded America what it was like to win a war," the Los Angeles Times writes.

-- "Became the most celebrated U.S. military hero of his generation," says The Washington Post.

-- Was "the nation's most acclaimed military hero since the midcentury exploits of Generals Dwight D. Eisenhower and Douglas MacArthur," adds The New York Times.

On Morning Edition, retired Maj. Gen. Robert Scales Jr., who served with Schwarzkopf and who wrote a history of the Gulf War, told host David Greene that the victory in Kuwait "removed the scar of the Vietnam generation" from officers, such as Schwarzkopf, who had also served in that earlier war.

Schwarzkopf never forgot the Vietnam experience, Scales said, and "spent those 20 years after Vietnam working to rebuild the Army."

The general's "streak of independence" led him to reject some of the early plans for the Gulf War and to demand more forces for the effort, Scales added. And in the end, Schwarzkopf's demands produced a fast, decisive victory.

As for the general's nickname, it was in recognition of his "volatile temper," as Scales said. Schwarzkopf could sometimes speak "quite loudly and bluntly to those who worked for him" if he thought they weren't doing their jobs, said Scales.

Copyright 2012 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR

Dystopian Novel Challenges Misogyny As 'The Natural Way Of Things'

Charlotte Wood's short, gripping book focuses on 10 women who have been sent to a prison camp after various sex scandals. Critic John Powers calls The Natural Way of Things a ferocious novel.
NPR

Collards And Canoodling: How Helen Gurley Brown Promoted Premarital Cooking

The legendary Cosmo editor, subject of two new biographies, knew sex sells – and food brings in ad money. She cannily combined them with features like "After Bed, What? (a light snack for an encore)."
NPR

The Rise And Fall Of FOX News CEO Roger Ailes

Ailes resigned last week amid allegations of sexual harassment. Biographer Gabriel Sherman joins Fresh Air to discuss the accusations, as well as Ailes' influence on political discourse in America.
NPR

FBI Investigates Possible Russian Connection To Leaked DNC Emails

Hackers tied to two Russian intelligence agencies breached DNC computers in May, but whether the same hackers turned over thousands of emails to WikiLeaks is still under investigation.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.