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Wintry Weather Blasting Northeast On Its Way Out

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Traffic winds its way east and west along a snowy Boulder-Denver Turnpike, in Superior, Colo., Wednesday. A storm that has dumped more than a foot of snow in the Rocky Mountains is heading east and is forecast to bring the first major winter storm of the season.
AP Photo/Brennan Linsley
Traffic winds its way east and west along a snowy Boulder-Denver Turnpike, in Superior, Colo., Wednesday. A storm that has dumped more than a foot of snow in the Rocky Mountains is heading east and is forecast to bring the first major winter storm of the season.

Update at 12:25 p.m. ET. More Deaths Reported:

The death toll from this week's massive winter storm that barreled across the nation from the West Coast and is now over New England has risen to at least 15, according to The Associated Press.

Among the latest fatalities to be reported: "A man and a woman in Evansville, Ind., were killed when the scooter they were riding went out of control on a snowy street Wednesday and they were hit by a pickup truck."

Our original post, from 7 a.m. ET:

The storm that spread snow across much of the nation and sent tornadoes roaring across parts of the Southeast on Tuesday and Wednesday isn't done just yet.

It's "expected to drop one to two feet of snow on parts of the Northeast," The Associated Press reports. The heaviest accumulations "will be in northern Pennsylvania, upstate New York and inland sections of several New England states before [it] heads to Canada on Friday."

With the death of an 18-year-old girl near Cincinnati, the wintry weather (which we followed here on Wednesday) is now blamed for seven fatalities. According to the AP, authorities say the girl lost control of the car she was driving Wednesday. It was then hit by an oncoming snow plow.

The Weather Channel, which has taken it upon itself to start naming winter storms and calls this one Euclid, says that by the time it's done Euclid "will have deposited snow from California's Sierra Nevada Mountains to New England."

As you would expect, many folks' travel plans have been disrupted. Roads have been too treacherous for travel at times from Texas to New England. And from Tuesday through Wednesday, the AP says, "more than 1,600 flights were canceled, according to the aviation tracking website FlightAware.com." There's some good news on that front today. The wire service reports that "despite the wet weather, no flights are delayed Thursday morning cities like New York, Philadelphia and Boston."

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