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NRA Addresses Newtown Shooting

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The National Rifle Association executive vice president Wayne LaPierre gestures as he speaks about the violent online video game "Kindergarten Killers", left, during a news conference in response to the Connecticut school shooting on Friday, Dec. 21, 2012 in Washington.
AP Photo/ Evan Vucci
The National Rifle Association executive vice president Wayne LaPierre gestures as he speaks about the violent online video game "Kindergarten Killers", left, during a news conference in response to the Connecticut school shooting on Friday, Dec. 21, 2012 in Washington.

The outrage over the Sandy Hook Elementary massacre in Connecticut last week sparking renewed protests in Washington today, and a promise from religious leaders to take action.

Several dozen protesters demonstrated outside the Willard Hotel, while inside, the National Rifle Association addressed shootings for the first time.

"The National Rifle Association -- 4 million mothers, fathers, sons and daughters -- join the nation in horror, outrage, grief, and earnest prayer for the families of Newtown, Conn., who have suffered such an incomprehensible loss as a result of this unspeakable crime," said NRA executive vice president Wayne LaPierre. "Out of respect for the families and until the facts are known, the NRA has refrained from comment. While some have tried to exploit tragedy for political gain, we have remained respectably silent. Now, we must speak for the safety of our nation's children."

The guns right group promised a meaningful contribution to prevent mass shootings, but gun critics don't believe the NRA has any intention to actually work to curb gun violence, or to stop the sale of semi-automatic weapons.

Friday morning, a group of interfaith leaders representing Muslims, Jews, Christians, and Sikhs met at the National Cathedral to ask President Obama and Congress to ban assault-type weapons, high-capacity magazines, and military-type ordinance.

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