Maryland Bill Cracks Down On Drunk Drivers With Kids In Cars | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

WAMU 88.5 : News

Maryland Bill Cracks Down On Drunk Drivers With Kids In Cars

Play associated audio
A proposed bill in Maryland cracks down on drunk drivers with children in their cars.
http://www.flickr.com/photos/gluemoon/250057063/
A proposed bill in Maryland cracks down on drunk drivers with children in their cars.

Drunk driving becomes a bigger problem around the holidays, and in Maryland, the punishment for a certain kind of drunk driver could soon be on the rise.

Del. Sam Arora of Montgomery County has introduced a bill for next month's General Assembly session that would put a breathalyzer ignition lock in the car of any driver convicted of drunk driving with a child in the car. Currently, a lock can only be imposed as punishment if the driver has a blood alcohol content nearly twice the legal limit.

Arora thinks that's too high a threshold for a drunk driver caught with a child in the car. His bill would impose the lock for those caught anywhere higher than the legal limit of .08.

"Children don't really have a say as to how they are going to get around," says Arora. "They're usually beholden to parents and other caregivers. I just think every child deserves a designated driver."

Arora says the number of DUIs in Maryland where a child is present in the car has risen 10 percent in the past two years.

"Last year we even saw a woman in Salisbury pulled over multiple times within a 3-hour span for driving drunk with a child in the car," he says.

Currently, the locks can only be imposed if the driver had a blood alcohol limit of 0.15, which is nearly twice the legal limit.

NPR

'Welcome To Braggsville' Isn't Quite 'Invisible Man,' But It's Close

T. Geronimo Johnson's latest follows four Berkeley students who take an American history class that leads to disaster. It's an ambitious book about race that wants to say something big about America.
NPR

Tea Tuesdays: Kenyan Farmers See Green In The Color Purple

Kenya has spent 25 years developing a purple "supertea" with high levels of antioxidants. The hope is that the tea will appeal to health-minded consumers and revive the country's struggling industry.
NPR

Round Two: Health Care Law Faces The Supreme Court Again

In King v. Burwell, Obamacare opponents are challenging it again, this time contending that a section of the law doesn't authorize subsidies to make mandated insurance affordable in 34 states.
NPR

Official Says FAA Is Trying To Keep Hackers Out Of Air Traffic Control

FAA Administrator Michael Huerta tells a House panel some vulnerabilities reported in a congressional study have been fixed, and the agency is working on others.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.