UDC Fires President Allen Sessoms | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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UDC Fires President Allen Sessoms

Former president now asking for severance

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Allen Sessoms has been fired as president of the University of the District of Columbia, reports the Associated Press. The university's board of trustees announced the firing of Sessoms in a statement Wednesday night. The decision followed a four-hour closed-door meeting.

Sessoms has been president of UDC since September 2008. He served previously at Delaware State University and Queens College.

The trustees said in their statement, they're seeking new leadership to guide the university through the challenges of reducing staff and programs while trying to attract new students.

In 2009, Sessoms reorganized UDC creating a separate two-year community college, raising tuition and admissions standards for four-year students.

The board expects to name an interim president by mid-January. That person would serve 6 to 18 months.

Update Dec. 21: Sessoms is arguing that he was fired without cause and is entitled to one full year of his salary —$295,000 — in severance, the Washington Post reports.

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