NPR : News

Filed Under:

House Punts Tax Bill Vote And Goes Into Recess

The House of Representatives went on recess Thursday after failing to vote on Speaker John Boehner's "Plan B" measure to avert a fiscal cliff. It earlier passed a companion measure that would avoid looming cuts to defense spending and instead apply cuts to other programs.

Update at 8:03 p.m. ET: 'Plan B' Vote Dropped:

The House has failed to take up a vote on House Speaker John Boehner's "Plan B" measure. In a statement, the speaker said the House did not have enough support for the bill.

"Now it is up to the president to work with Senator Reid on legislation to avert the fiscal cliff," Boehner said.

For background on the measure, visit our friends at It's All Politics.

Update at 7:53 p.m. ET: House Recesses:

The House abruptly went into recess after the defense spending measure passed by a narrow margin. The House was expected to vote on Boehner's tax measure, but there is debate about whether the Republicans will have enough votes to approve it.

Our Original Post Continues:

The House has passed a $633 billion defense spending bill that makes domestic cuts while sparing the military. The measure is a companion bill to House Speaker John Boehner's tax measure to avoid the "fiscal cliff" that would come if Democrats and Republicans fail to agree on a comprehensive deal.

The final vote on the Republican-backed spending bill was 215-209. The measure would reorganize the "sequestration" that is part of the year-end deadline that will bring broad tax hikes and spending cuts. The Hill reports that 21 Republicans voted against the measure.

As C-SPAN explains, the House Republicans' tax measure, known as "Plan B," "would permanently extend the Bush-era tax rates for everyone on the first $1 million of earned income."

Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, a Democrat, said Thursday that the tax legislation would not come to a vote in the Senate. And President Obama has vowed to veto the measure if it makes it to his desk.

Copyright 2012 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR

From Tahrir To Tiananmen, 'City Squares' Can't Escape Their History

Governments have tried to erase the evidence of some squares' troubled pasts, but that doesn't mean they've been forgotten. A new book gathers writers' thoughts about famous squares around the world.
NPR

When It Came To Food, Neanderthals Weren't Exactly Picky Eaters

During the Ice Age, it seems Neanderthals tended to chow down on whatever was most readily available. Early humans, on the other hand, maintained a consistent diet regardless of environmental changes.
NPR

10 Years After Immigration Protests, What Has Changed?

Jose Antonio Vargas of Define American, Fermin Vasquez of the SEIU and Jessica Vaughan of the Center for Immigration Studies discuss the legacy of 10 years of activism for immigration reform.
NPR

'The Guardian' Launches New Series Examining Online Abuse

A video was released this week where female sports journalists were read abusive online comments to their face. It's an issue that reaches far beyond that group, and The Guardian is taking it on in a series called "The Web We Want." NPR's Audie Cornish speaks with series editor Becky Gardiner and writer Nesrine Malik, who receives a lot of online abuse.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.