Judge Sentences Prince George's Officer In UMD Beating | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Judge Sentences Prince George's Officer In UMD Beating

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Video shot by a fellow student shows officers Reginald Baker and James Harrison beating University of Maryland John McKenna without provocation.
Video shot by a fellow student shows officers Reginald Baker and James Harrison beating University of Maryland John McKenna without provocation.

A judge has sentenced, James Harrison, a former Prince George's County police officer to 30 days of home detention for beating a University of Maryland student during a rowdy celebration following a Terrapin basketball victory over Duke.

Harrison received a one-year home detention sentence that was reduced to 30 days, plus 18 months of unsupervised probation.

The judge handing down the punishment said she considered the jury's second-degree assault in October, and the fact that a brutal beating did occur. But the judge says before the infamous 2010 beating, Harrison had a clean record during his 22-year tenure as a law enforcement officer. Before that, he had an honorable discharge after spending eight years in the military. The prosecution had asked for jail time.

As for the Maryland student who was beaten, his attorney says he is now considering a career in law.

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