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D.C. Council Member Calls For $25 Money Order Contribution Limit

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D.C. Council member Mary Cheh is pushing for speedy campaign finance reform.
Mallory Noe-Payne
D.C. Council member Mary Cheh is pushing for speedy campaign finance reform.

D.C. Council member Mary Cheh is introducing emergency legislation to ban money-order campaign contributions greater than $25.

Cheh says she is disappointed the council has so far failed to enact comprehensive campaign finance reform, but she says an emergency bill would allow large money order contributions to be banned in time for the upcoming special election for the at-large council seat recently vacated by now-Chairman Phil Mendelson.

The councilwoman further says fraudulent money orders have played a big part in recent campaign finance scandals.

She says money order contributions should be limited to $25, which is the maximum cash contribution.

Two aides to Mayor Vincent Gray's 2010 campaign have pleaded guilty to making illicit money order contributions to another candidate. Donors linked to Jeffrey Thompson, the businessman who is at the center of a corruption probe, have given money orders to Gray and others.

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