Anne Arundel Student Dies From Suspected Meningitis Case | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Anne Arundel Student Dies From Suspected Meningitis Case

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School officials in Maryland's Anne Arundel County are dealing with the death of a student from a very dangerous disease.

A female student at Glen Burnie High School died on Tuesday, just one day after falling ill. The symptoms were consistent with bacterial meningitis, according to Anne Arundel County school authorities.

The disease attacks the blood, the brain, or the spinal cord. It produces fever, headache and stiffness of the neck.

Anne Arundel County school officials sent a letter and made robocalls to parents of students at the school, advising them of the situation.

Bacterial meningitis can be spread through kissing or the sharing of food and beverages, but not usually casual contact such as sitting next to someone. Still, health officials are closely examining any student that may have come into contact with a victim over the last two weeks.

The name of the student, a junior at the school, has not been released.

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