Just Because We Can: 12 Lines Of 12 Words Each About 12-12-12 | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Just Because We Can: 12 Lines Of 12 Words Each About 12-12-12

Last year, lots of folks certainly seemed to be excited about 11/11/11.

So we feel obliged to point out the obvious: Today is 12/12/12.

And, yes, once again there's much fuss being made about a date:

-- "Other-dimensional energy abounds" on double-digit dates, numerologist Scott Petullo tells ABC News.

-- "12/12/12 heralds the end of the world," many doomsdayers warn Global Post.

-- But the digits add up to three, which is lucky, says CNN.

-- "Wedding chapels hope lure of 12-12-12 will boost revenue," says USA Today.

-- A serious note: Stars gather tonight for 12/12/12 "concert for Sandy relief."

As for silly stories about dates, Gawker notes it's an old tradition.

On Dec. 12, 1912, The New York Times took it rather seriously.

"Celebrate by writing a great many letters and dating them," it advised.

Let's update that advice: 12-word comments, Tweets, blog posts or emails, perhaps?

Copyright 2012 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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