NPR : News

Sick Of Year-End Lists Yet? Or Do You Love Them?

Twitter's out with its take on what the tweets of 2012 supposedly tell us about ourselves. The "Golden Tweets" (most retweeted) were the "four more years" photo of President Obama and the first lady hugging, and the "RIP Avalanna. i love you" post from Justin Bieber about six-year-old Avalanna Routh before the little girl — a big fan — died.

Gawker has chosen "2012's Most Annoying Memes." We immediately disagreed with its first pick: "Texts From Hillary." But we second their suggestion that "Ecce Homo" was one of the year's best.

Of course NPR is no stranger to year-end lists. There's our "10 Eye-Catching Reads For The Book Lover On Your List." And voting continues until 5 p.m. ET today on the "Favorite Albums of 2012."

Every news outlet seems to some sort of year-end list. We'll probably do one or two ourselves. We can, for instance, share a 2012 factoid with you now:

The most-viewed Two-Way post this year was "Sweden Wants Your Trash," with 849,000 (and counting) clicks.

We're not sure what that says about either your Two-Way hosts or you Two-Way readers.

But, we wonder:

Copyright 2012 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR

How A Music Writer Learned Trust Is The Ultimate Backstage Pass

Lisa Robinson knows how to talk — and how to make others, especially musicians, want to talk. The veteran rock journalist speaks with NPR's Wade Goodwyn about her four decades behind the scenes.
NPR

Can Wal-Mart Really Make Organic Food Cheap For Everyone?

The giant retailer says it's adding a new line of organic food that's at least 25 percent cheaper. But a large-scale production and supply of organic food likely can't be achieved overnight.
NPR

Obama Adds Malaysia To His Asia Itinerary

Obama travels to Malaysia next week, where the government is under fire for the handling of a missing airliner. NPR's Wade Goodwyn talks to Josh Kurlantzick of the Council on Foreign Relations.
NPR

Watch For The Blind Lets You Feel Time Passing

A new watch allows the blind to feel time on their wrists. Designer Hyungsoo Kim tells NPR's Wade Goodwyn his watch allows users to tell time accurately without revealing their disabilities.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.