NPR : News

Sick Of Year-End Lists Yet? Or Do You Love Them?

Twitter's out with its take on what the tweets of 2012 supposedly tell us about ourselves. The "Golden Tweets" (most retweeted) were the "four more years" photo of President Obama and the first lady hugging, and the "RIP Avalanna. i love you" post from Justin Bieber about six-year-old Avalanna Routh before the little girl — a big fan — died.

Gawker has chosen "2012's Most Annoying Memes." We immediately disagreed with its first pick: "Texts From Hillary." But we second their suggestion that "Ecce Homo" was one of the year's best.

Of course NPR is no stranger to year-end lists. There's our "10 Eye-Catching Reads For The Book Lover On Your List." And voting continues until 5 p.m. ET today on the "Favorite Albums of 2012."

Every news outlet seems to some sort of year-end list. We'll probably do one or two ourselves. We can, for instance, share a 2012 factoid with you now:

The most-viewed Two-Way post this year was "Sweden Wants Your Trash," with 849,000 (and counting) clicks.

We're not sure what that says about either your Two-Way hosts or you Two-Way readers.

But, we wonder:

Copyright 2012 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR

Writer James Alan McPherson, Winner Of Pulitzer, MacArthur And Guggenheim, Dies At 72

McPherson, the first African-American to win the Pulitzer Prize for fiction, has died at 72. His work explored the intersection of white and black lives with deftness, subtlety and wry humor.
NPR

QUIZ: How Much Do You Know About Presidents And Food?

It's week two of the party conventions, and all these speeches are making us hungry. So we made a quiz to test your savvy about presidents and our favorite topic, food.
WAMU 88.5

Your Turn: Ronald Reagan's Shooter, Freddie Gray Verdicts And More

Have opinions about the Democratic National Convention, or the verdicts from the Freddie Gray cases? It's your turn to talk.

NPR

Police Use Fingertip Replicas To Unlock A Murder Victim's Phone

Michigan State University engineers tried 3-D-printed fingertips and special conductive replicas of the victim's fingerprints to crack the biometric lock on his Samsung Galaxy phone.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.