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Conflict Arises Over Virginia's Public-Private Transportation Act

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Questions about a conflict of interest have members of the Arlington County board at odds over a planned trolley on Columbia Pike.

Recently elected Arlington County Board member Libby Garvey released an email to the press, calling on the county board to delay today's vote on Virginia's Public-Private Transportation Act, which would be used for the design and construction of a trolley line in Crystal City.

Garvey also wants fellow board member Chris Zimmerman to recuse himself because she says his consultant with AECOM, a transportation design and build company that worked on parts of the Columbia Pike Trolley project, are a conflict of interest.

Zimmerman refused, and Arlington County Attorney Stephen MacIsaac says his consultant work doesn't violate Virginia law. Board chair Mary Hynes, along with members Walter Tejada and Jay Fisette, also went to the media, releasing a statement saying they are dismayed Garvey shared a private email with the press.

WAMU 88.5

Introducing Capital Soundtrack, A New WAMU Music Project

What does Washington sound like? Capital Soundtrack, a new music project from WAMU 88.5, explores that question.
NPR

Evaporated Cane Juice? Puh-leeze. Just Call It Sugar, FDA Says

Companies cultivating a healthful image often list "evaporated cane juice" in their products' ingredients. But the FDA says it's really just sugar, and that's what food labels should call it.
WAMU 88.5

The Politics Hour - May 27, 2016

Congress votes to override DC's 2013 ballot initiative on budget autonomy. Virginia governor faces a federal investigation over international finance and lobbying rules. And DC, Maryland and Virginia move to create a Metro safety oversight panel.

NPR

After Departure Of Uber, Lyft In Austin, New Companies Enter The Void

Earlier this month, voters in Austin, Texas, rejected an effort to overturn the city's rules for ride-hailing companies. Uber and Lyft tried to prevent fingerprinting of their drivers, and now both have left town. A few other ride-share companies have popped up to help fill the void. NPR explores how people are getting around town without Uber and Lyft.

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