Winning Ticket Submitted For Second Half Of Powerball Jackpot | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Winning Ticket Submitted For Second Half Of Powerball Jackpot

The remaining winner of the $587.5 million Powerball jackpot has come forward to claim their share of the prize, according to lottery officials in Arizona, where the winning ticket was sold, according to ABC 15 TV in Phoenix.

The Nov. 28 drawing produced two winning tickets: one in Arizona, and one in Missouri, where Cindy and Mark Hill have already claimed their share of the prize.

Arizona Lottery officials tell the AP that the ticket is held by a family, and that the winners will be identified sometime next week. Officials say the holders of the winning ticket will not appear at a news conference this afternoon.

As the Hill family did at the end of November, the anonymous Arizona winners have elected to receive their winnings in a one-time cash payout of $192 million — or $136.5 million after taxes, as NBC reports.

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