Wikileaks Day Nine: Jailer Says Manning Was Uncommunicative | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Wikileaks Day Nine: Jailer Says Manning Was Uncommunicative

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In this June 25, 2012 file photo, Army Pfc. Bradley Manning, right, is escorted out of a courthouse in Fort Meade, Md.
(AP Photo/Patrick Semansky, File)
In this June 25, 2012 file photo, Army Pfc. Bradley Manning, right, is escorted out of a courthouse in Fort Meade, Md.

The eighth day of testimony in the pretrial hearing of the Army private at the center of the Wikileaks scandal again focused on the treatment he received while in detention.

Chief Warrant Officer 2 Denise Barnes, a former Marine Corp brig commander, testified Friday she never intended it as punishment when she ordered underwear removed from Army Pfc. Bradley Manning, charged with giving classified material to WikiLeaks. She says she kept him on suicide watch because he was uncommunicative.

Manning claims the nine months he spent in maximum custody at the base in Quantico, Va., were illegal punishment, and his case should be dismissed.

The government says the restrictions were to keep Manning from hurting or killing himself.

Barnes testified that Manning said in early March that if he really wanted to kill himself, he could use the elastic waistband of his underwear.

Barnes ordered his underwear removed at night for the remaining seven weeks of Manning's confinement. He was also kept in hand and leg irons for the 20 minutes per day he was allowed out of his cell.

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