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Oceans Rising At Higher Rate Than Expected

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A new assessment on sea level rise from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration claims oceans are rising at a much higher rate than scientists previously thought.

NOAA scientists are estimating sea levels will rise 6 feet 6 inches by the end of this century. That's three times the rate the United Nations is currently projecting, and double the median rate officials in coastal Delaware have been planning for.

And with higher sea levels, the damage done during major storm events like Hurricane Sandy is expected to be much greater on coastal communities, and will put at risk the nation's energy, military, and commercial assets on the coast.

NOAA says the U.S. Gulf Coast and the Chesapeake Bay will likely experience the most rapid rate of sea level rise in the next hundred years, while the Pacific Northwest may be relatively unchanged.

In June, a U.S. Geological Survey reported that the Atlantic Coast was experiencing sea level rise at a rate three to four times more than the global average, and about 1.5 inches per decade since 1950.

NPR

'Kids Love To Be Scared': Louis Sachar On Balancing Fun And Fear

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NPR

Confronting A Shortage Of Eggs, Bakers Get Creative With Replacements

Eggs are becoming more expensive and scarce recently because so many chickens have died from avian flu. So bakers, in particular, are looking for cheaper ingredients that can work just as well.
WAMU 88.5

How Artificial Intelligence And Robots Will Impact Jobs And How We Think About Work

Many experts say artificial intelligence and robots will displace jobs at a faster and faster pace over the coming decade. What changes in technology could mean for how we work.

WAMU 88.5

How Artificial Intelligence And Robots Will Impact Jobs And How We Think About Work

Many experts say artificial intelligence and robots will displace jobs at a faster and faster pace over the coming decade. What changes in technology could mean for how we work.

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