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Oceans Rising At Higher Rate Than Expected

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A new assessment on sea level rise from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration claims oceans are rising at a much higher rate than scientists previously thought.

NOAA scientists are estimating sea levels will rise 6 feet 6 inches by the end of this century. That's three times the rate the United Nations is currently projecting, and double the median rate officials in coastal Delaware have been planning for.

And with higher sea levels, the damage done during major storm events like Hurricane Sandy is expected to be much greater on coastal communities, and will put at risk the nation's energy, military, and commercial assets on the coast.

NOAA says the U.S. Gulf Coast and the Chesapeake Bay will likely experience the most rapid rate of sea level rise in the next hundred years, while the Pacific Northwest may be relatively unchanged.

In June, a U.S. Geological Survey reported that the Atlantic Coast was experiencing sea level rise at a rate three to four times more than the global average, and about 1.5 inches per decade since 1950.

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