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Alan Simpson Goes 'Gangnam Style'

How can you get young folks to press their elders to solve the debt and deficit crises?

Have 81-year-old former Sen. Alan Simpson go "Gangnam style," of course.

The Wyoming Republican, who's well-known for his sense of humor, his blunt talk about the nation's fiscal problems and for his efforts to come up with some solutions, has lent his name and dance moves to The Can Kicks Back. That's "a non-partisan, Millennial-driven campaign to fix the national debt and reclaim our American Dream."

There's video of Simpson's Gangnam style appeal. "Stop Instagramming your breakfast, and tweeting your first-world problems, and getting on YouTube so you can see Gangnam style," Simpson says, before busting (sort of) some moves. As USA Today's On Politics blog says, "yes, we are talking about an 81-year-old man, jumping up and down as though he is galloping on a horse, doing his best imitation of the South Korean musician PSY's moves."

As for the so-called fiscal cliff that comes at the end of the year, when Bush-era tax cuts expire and automatic spending cuts are set to kick in, these stories signal one reason a deal may yet be struck:

-- "Boehner Gains Strong Backing From House Republicans." (The New York Times)

" Should his support hold up, Mr. Boehner, who faced a frequent battering from his own members over the last two years as he tried to seal deals on various spending agreements, would be better able to negotiate from a point of relative Republican unity. And, most important, he would be viewed as able to sell a deal to his once-fractious caucus.

"On Wednesday, in a private meeting between Mr. Boehner and House Republicans, member after member spoke in support of him, in some cases saying a deal they would have rejected six months ago would most likely be taken today."

-- "Some In GOP Urge Lawmakers To Back Tax Hikes For Changes In Safety-net Programs." (The Washington Post)

"A growing chorus of Republicans is urging House leaders to abandon their staunch opposition to higher tax rates for the wealthy with the aim of clearing the way for a broad deal that would also rein in the cost of federal health and retirement programs."

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