Why Drinking Tea Was Once Considered A Dangerous Habit | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

NPR : News

Why Drinking Tea Was Once Considered A Dangerous Habit

Given tea's rap today as both a popular pick-me-up and a health elixir, it's hard to imagine that sipping tea was once thought of as a reckless, suspicious act, linked to revolutionary feminism.

Huh? Well, the feminist complaints came from 19th century, upper class Irish critics who argued that peasant women shouldn't be wasting their time — and limited resources — on tea. If women had time to sit down and enjoy a tea break, this must mean they were ignoring their domestic duties and instead, perhaps, opening the door to political engagement or even rebellion.

"Drinking tea was thought to threaten traditional ways," explains researcher Helen O'Connell of Durham University in the UK. In the 1800s, tea was an affront to the virtues of frugality and restraint, which underpinned rural Irish culture.

In a new paper published in the journal Literature and History, O'Connell explores the angst about tea by combing through popular pamphlets — or short works of fiction — published in the 1800s. The pamphlets were published by reformers who were trying to weave tales of morality and clean-living into story form.

In one pamphlet, "Cottage Dialouges," written by the Irish Quaker author and reformer Mary Leadbeater, a dialogue between two women makes it clear that tea-drinking was considered a lavish, irresponsible behavior that could be habit-forming. Though the characters don't know the language of addiction, they use the phrase "hankering after it" — as if to suggest that once you'd had your first cup of tea, it would impossible to stop or control your longings. Adding to this suggestion is the fact that tea was sold at liquor stores.

The reformers' campaign against tea took on another moral outrage too: slavery. Since tea was typically sweetened with sugar at the time, reformers in Ireland tried to convince people that tea-drinking was akin to drinking the blood of slaves who were forced to work the plantations where sugar was produced.

O'Connell says clearly, in the end, the campaign against tea was not successful. Consumption of tea continued to grow steadily during this period.

To us, the campaign against tea, particularly the suggestions it may lead to revolutionary feminism, may seem crazy.

But in some ways, O'Connell says, "contemporary culture has all of these ideas about food which might appear ludicrous in time to come."

Any examples come to mind? "Maybe organic food, I don't know," O'Connell says. Or maybe the way we obsess over gluten. "Working on this project has made me a bit more critical of food discourse," she says. "Our passions and beliefs sometimes take over."

Copyright 2012 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

WAMU 88.5

Art Beat With Lauren Landau, June 3, 2015

A play and an exhibit explore luxury, power and how women present themselves and are perceived.

NPR

Grass Gourmands: A Herbivore Food Mystery On The African Savanna

A new study sheds light on a longstanding ecological question: How do so many species like impalas and elephants co-exist when they're all feeding on the same limited foods?
NPR

5 Things You Should Know About Lincoln Chafee

In 2002, Lincoln Chafee was the only Republican senator to vote against authorizing the use of force to oust Saddam Hussein in Iraq. Some Republican colleagues referred to him as "the missing Linc."
NPR

Experts Debate: Will Computers Edge People Out Of Entire Careers?

Machines have been taking jobs forever. Computers and software are doing things people were paid to do. They are booking airplane flights. Filing our taxes. And they are getting better all the time.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.