Newseum Marks 50th Anniversary Of Kennedy Assassination | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Newseum Marks 50th Anniversary Of Kennedy Assassination

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The Newseum in Washington, D.C. is planning to mark the 50th anniversary of the assassination of President John F. Kennedy next year with a new film and exhibits chronicling the 35th president's life.

One planned exhibit called "Creating Camelot" will feature restored photographs taken by Kennedy's personal photographer, Jacques Lowe. His photos begin during Kennedy's 1958 Senate re-election campaign and run through his early White House years.

Lowe's original negatives were stored in a vault at the World Trade Center and were lost in the 9/11 attacks. The Newseum restored more than 70 images from original prints and contact sheets kept elsewhere for this rare public display.

The Newseum is also creating an exhibit looking at the media's reporting of Kennedy's assassination in Dallas in November of 1963, and a film called "A Thousand Days" that will examine his time in office.

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