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WikiLeaks: Bradley Manning Hearing To Resume Wednesday

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The pretrial hearing of Army Private Bradley Manning at Fort Meade in Maryland is on hold until Wednesday. Military court officials wrapped up the sixth day of testimony in the WikiLeaks case pretrial proceeding Sunday.

The court at this point isn't hearing testimony about allegations that Manning leaked hundreds of thousands of classified documents. Instead, the proceedings are focusing solely on his treatment in prison. His lawyers want the case tossed because he was held in extreme isolation for nine months.

The court heard testimony Saturday and Sunday from three men on the board that held Manning on the restrictive status. All three men said he never had discipline problems, but they argued he displayed odd behavior and said things that worried them. Manning claimed he was a woman, which was a factor in keeping Manning isolated, according to Master Sergeant Craig Blenis, a senior board member who testified.

In day five of Mannin's pretrial hearing, former guards at the Marine Corps brig in Quantico, Va., also told their version of events.

Marine Lance Cpl. Jonathan Cline testified that some brig workers were bothered by pro-Manning protests that closed Quantico's main gate when Manning was confined to that facility for nine months.

Although Klein testified he wasn't affected by the inconvenience, Manning's defense attorney, David Coombs, suggested that Klein and the other guard retaliated by bullying Manning. Defense lawyers say Manning's confinement to a 6 ft. by 8 ft. cell for 23 hours a day was unmerited.

Manning supporters, including Emma Cape of the Bradley Manning Support Network, argue the private was never a threat to himself or others.

"It's also clear to me they were mostly concerned that he would be available to stand trial," says Cape. "They weren't exactly concerned about his quality of life."

The testimony from Blenis,

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