Train Derails Near Philadelphia, Some Chemicals Reportedly Spilled | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Train Derails Near Philadelphia, Some Chemicals Reportedly Spilled

There's a developing story this morning from Paulsboro, N.J., south and across the Delaware River from Philadelphia, where several railroad tank cars have derailed and fallen into a creek after a bridge collapse.

It's being reported that the cars were transporting vinyl chloride, which could ignite and would be highly irritating if breathed in. There are local reports of about 18 people being treated for breathing problems.

Residents in the area have been told to stay inside. Schools have been locked down. Some highways in the area have been closed. Interstate-295, which goes through the area, was still open as of 9:45 a.m. ET.

Local news outlets are out in force. If you're looking for updates, here are some that are posting updates and/or streaming live video:

-- The South Jersey Times, which notes that "this is the same bridge that collapsed in August 2009 as a 50-car coal train passed over it, spilling 16 cars into the water."

-- NBC10 in Philadelphia.

-- New Jersey 101.5.

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