WAMU 88.5 : News

Filed Under:

DCBOEE Plans Special Election To Fill Mendelson's Seat

Play associated audio
A photo sent out from Mayor Vincent Gray's Twitter account shows Phil Mendelson being sworn in as the new D.C. Council Chairman.
Mayor Vincent Gray
A photo sent out from Mayor Vincent Gray's Twitter account shows Phil Mendelson being sworn in as the new D.C. Council Chairman.

Get ready for another special election in the District — this one was set in motion by the resignation of Kwame Brown earlier this year. Last night, Phil Mendelson was sworn in as the new D.C. Council Chairman.

D.C.'s Board of Elections says it's picked April 23 to hold the race to fill Mendelson's seat, and it already looks like many former council candidates from the past few years are going to try their luck again.

Council Member Michael Brown, who lost in November to David Grosso and is serving out the remainder of his term, has also expressed interest in running in the special election.

The city's Democratic Party will also play a role — the D.C. Democratic State Committee will pick the interim council member on Dec. 10 — and whoever wins that appointment could have a leg up on the rest of field, at least in terms of fundraising or visibility.

NPR

How Fishermen's Bragging Rights Gave Birth To Fine Art

In 19th century Japan, fishermen found a foolproof way to record trophy catches: a "fish rubbing" inked onto paper, creating a permanent record of their size. Gyotaku soon evolved into fine art.
NPR

How Fishermen's Bragging Rights Gave Birth To Fine Art

In 19th century Japan, fishermen found a foolproof way to record trophy catches: a "fish rubbing" inked onto paper, creating a permanent record of their size. Gyotaku soon evolved into fine art.
NPR

Donald Trump In 9 Quotes And 200 Seconds

Trump took his act on the road to Tennessee, where he thrilled a conservative audience with an off-the-cuff routine that bordered on stand-up comedy.
NPR

No More Standing By The Spigot: Messaging App Alerts Water Availability

A startup in India — where an aging, ad hoc system limits water availability — is using text messages to let people know when their faucets should work, so they don't waste hours awaiting the deluge.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.