Winning Powerball Tickets Sold In Arizona And Missouri; Who Bought Them? | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Winning Powerball Tickets Sold In Arizona And Missouri; Who Bought Them?

After all the hype and hoopla, millions of Americans (including us) are waking up this morning to learn that they aren't sudden millionaires.

Yes, there were winning tickets sold for Wednesday night's $580 million Powerball jackpot.

But there were only two tickets that correctly matched the numbers drawn: 5, 16, 22, 23, 29 and Powerball of 6.

The winners were sold in Arizona and Missouri. Now, the wait begins to see who steps forward with the winning tickets. Interestingly, just yesterday our friends at St. Louis Public Radio reported that Missouri already had "the second-most number of Powerball winners just behind Indiana." The odds, though, favor no one particular state, they added.

Wednesday's jackpot was the largest in Powerball history, and the second-largest in U.S. lottery history (to a $656 million Mega Millions jackpot in March). The "cash option" means the winners will be splitting about $380 million (before taxes). Of course, if the tickets were sold to groups that had pooled money, then each individual in those groups will be getting a share.

In happier news, we do not have any reports of anyone being crushed to death by a vending machine.

Update at 1:15 p.m. ET. Where The Tickets Were Sold:

-- "The Missouri Lottery said the winning ticket in Missouri was sold in the Kansas City region, in the town of Dearborn, Mo., about 30 miles north of Kansas City. The ticket was sold at Trex Mart, at 17605 Highway Z, in Dearborn. Trex Mart will get $50,000 for selling the winning ticket." (St. Louis Post-Dispatch)

-- "The winning #Arizona ticket in the #Powerball was a $10 quick pick ticket sold at 4 Sons Food Store at 13779 N. Fountain Hills Blvd.," in Fountain Hills, Ariz. (The Arizona Republic's Twitter feed.)

Copyright 2012 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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