Child Sex Trafficking A Major Problem In Virginia | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

WAMU 88.5 : News

Filed Under:

Child Sex Trafficking A Major Problem In Virginia

Play associated audio

Child sex trafficking is a far too common in Virginia, according to local detectives, who say they regularly rescue girls from the sex trade.

Fairfax county Detective Bill Woolf says nearly 40 girls in the Northern Virginia area have been rescued from gang-related sex trafficking rings within the past year.

"What we're noticing is the emerging trend of gangs transitioning from traditional crime to sex trafficking, basically because it's a lot easier for them with a higher profit yield," says Woolf.

He says the young ladies who are most vulnerable are the ones who come from dysfunctional families.

"And gangs also use varying methods to build their self-esteem, sometimes they provide them with drugs or money or other things of value to them that they lack at home," Woolf says.

Woolf says parental involvement and simply eating family dinners together are good deterrents. But he's also advocating for tougher laws on the criminals who engage in sex transactions with minors.

Virginia received an F rating in a study on child trafficking by Shared Hope International.

NPR

In 'Two Days,' A Mother Lobbies Coworkers For Her Job

The latest movie from filmmaking brothers Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardenne stars Marion Cotillard as a young mother who fights to keep from getting screwed over by her colleagues at work.
NPR

For Norwegian-Americans, Christmas Cheer Is Wrapped Up In Lefse

For many Norwegian-American families, the most anticipated Christmas treat isn't chocolate or sugar-dusted cookies. It's a simple potato-based pancake, spread with butter and sugar or jam.
NPR

North Korea Has An Interesting Offer. And Another Threat

The secretive regime denies any involvement with the Sony Pictures hack and says the U.S. must allow it to help find the real culprit. Or else.
NPR

Did North Korea Benefit From The Sony Cyberattack?

The FBI says North Korea was responsible for the Sony cyber hack. North Korea denies involvement. NPR's Rachel Martin talks about possible next steps with Georgetown University professor Victor Cha.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.