GOP Senators More Troubled About Benghazi After Talking With Amb. Rice | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

NPR : News

Filed Under:

GOP Senators More Troubled About Benghazi After Talking With Amb. Rice

After meeting with U.N. Ambassador Susan Rice this morning, three key Republican senators emerged to say they're more troubled — not less — by what they say were intelligence failures and misleading information concerning the September attack on the U.S. mission in Benghazi, Libya, which left four Americans dead.

One, Sen. Lindsey Graham of South Carolina, said it's too soon to even be speculating about promoting Rice to be secretary of state.

Congress needs to see "FBI interviews of survivors ... and what was said the night of the attack" about who might be responsible, Graham said, before considering the promotion of anyone who was involved in handling the intelligence before or after the Benghazi attack.

Graham was joined by senators John McCain of Arizona and Kelly Ayotte of New Hampshire. She said she's "more troubled, not less," after talking with Rice and top U.S. intelligence officials about the attacks.

Though President Obama has not yet nominated anyone to succeed Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton (who plans to soon leave), McCain, Graham and some other Republicans have already been saying they have doubts about whether Rice should get that job. They say she misled the nation by saying that the attacks may have begun as protests over a anti-Muslim video produced in California. The Obama administration and Rice's supporters say she was relying on guidance from intelligence agencies and that she did note that extremists may have been involved in the attacks.

She'll be meeting with other lawmakers. As The Associated Press writes, "Rice's series of meetings on Capitol Hill this week will therefore be a critical test both for Republicans, who will decide whether they can support her, and the administration, which must gauge whether Rice has enough support to merit a nomination."

Update at 12:45 p.m. Statements Not 'Intended To Mislead':

Abassador Susan Rice says during her meeting with the lawmakers, she stressed that while her statements were inaccurate they were not intended to mislead.

Here's the key part of the statement just released by the U.S. Mission to the United Nations:

"In the course of the meeting, we explained that the talking points provided by the intelligence community, and the initial assessment upon which they were based, were incorrect in a key respect: there was no protest or demonstration in Benghazi. While we certainly wish that we had had perfect information just days after the terrorist attack, as is often the case, the intelligence assessment has evolved. We stressed that neither I nor anyone else in the Administration intended to mislead the American people at any stage in this process, and the Administration updated Congress and the American people as our assessments evolved."

Copyright 2012 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR

Deggans Picks 'Gotham,' 'Black-ish,' 'The Flash' Among Fall TV's Best

As the fall TV season begins this week, NPR TV Critic Eric Deggans gives his picks on new shows to watch and a few to avoid (or hate watch, if you like).
NPR

Syrup Induces Pumpkin-Spiced Fever Dreams

Hugh Merwin, an editor at Grub Street, bought a 63-ounce jug of pumpkin spice syrup and put it in just about everything he ate for four days. As he tells NPR's Scott Simon, it did not go well.
NPR

Hillary Exhilaration Helps Energize Generation Z

Many young people are excited about the 2016 presidential election — and the chance to make history.
WAMU 88.5

Cellphones In Class Are No Problem In One Maryland School District

An Eastern Shore school district is allowing teachers to treat students' cellphones, tables and laptops as a resource rather than a nuisance.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.