VIDEO: High Dives Into 'World's Biggest Pile Of Leaves' | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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VIDEO: High Dives Into 'World's Biggest Pile Of Leaves'

In case you haven't fallen for its charms yet, there's a video of three fun guys from Utah and their friends jumping into the "world's biggest pile of leaves" that's getting lots of views these days.

You can see their high jinks here.

According to the Deseret News, Nick Garrett, Tyler White and Johnny Murdock collected an estimated 20,000 pounds of leaves to make a pile about 17 feet high and 60 feet in circumference behind a friend's house in Roy, Utah. Then, like any guys in their early 20s who concede they haven't quite grown up, they started flipping and falling into the pile from the home's roof.

The trio has had two other videos that went somewhat viral. They're trying to monetize their run. They call their venture, by the way, Bangakang. As the Deseret News says, it's a "takeoff from Peter Pan and the lost boys who never want to grow up and yell bangarang. With bangarang already taken, they opted for something close."

As for jumping into leaves from a roof, the stunt reminds this blogger of claims some of his older siblings made about things they did before he was born: including leaps from the old homestead's porch roof into piles of leaves and snow, depending on the season. Alas, there were no video phones back then to record it all.

Mandatory warning: Don't try any of this at home!

(H/T to CNN.)

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