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Police Hit Roads For Holiday To Combat Drunk Driving

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Police in Maryland, D.C. and Virginia will be on the lookout for drunk drivers over the Thanksgiving holiday.
Kipp Baker: http://www.flickr.com/photos/mrpixure/3135421163/
Police in Maryland, D.C. and Virginia will be on the lookout for drunk drivers over the Thanksgiving holiday.

As you head out for the Thanksgiving holiday, local law enforcement agencies will be working to keep the roads safe.

Several local agencies are coming together for the the Checkpoint Strikeforce Program. The goal is to make sure there aren't any deaths resulting from impaired driving this year. In an effort to reach this goal, they plan to use sobriety checkpoints and increase patrols across all participating jurisdictions — Virginia, D.C., Delaware, West Virginia and Maryland.

The program reminds revelers under the influence to find a designated driver or spend the night where the festivities are held. The effort starts Wednesday and is scheduled to go through Sunday.

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