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New Controversial Ads Displayed At Metro Stations

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There are some new controversial advertisements in Metro stations. The anti-Islamic ads aren't getting the same reaction as the anti-Jihad ads that went up last month.

The new ads went up at the beginning of the month and read, "Soon shall we cast terror into the hearts of the unbelievers." They're up in the Glenmont, Georgia Avenue and U Street metro stations and feature a picture of a plane crashing into the World Trade Center.

Ibrahim Hooper with the Council on American-Islamic Relations says the verse is mistranslated from the Koran and taken out of context.

The council put up counter ads when the American Freedom Defense Initiative put up the initial controversial ads, but Hooper says not this time.

"The Muslim community and the civil rights community are not really motivated to give Pamela Geller and her hate group anymore free publicity," says Hooper. "We've established our point, it's clear that she's promoting hatred and bigotry."

At the bottom of the ads is a disclaimer explaining that advertising space is a public forum and does not imply Metro's endorsement. This disclaimer now appears on all political or advocacy ads in the Metro system.

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