Lawmakers Have More Questions On Benghazi Talking Points | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

NPR : News

Lawmakers Have More Questions On Benghazi Talking Points

Lawmakers want to know who made changes to the intelligence assessment of the deadly Sept. 11 attack on the U.S. consulate in Benghazi, Libya.

Speaking on NBC's Meet the Press, Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., said Congress had asked the White House to explain the Obama administration's talking points in the aftermath of the attack.

"We gave the direction yesterday that this whole process is going to be checked out," said Feinstein, who heads the Senate Intelligence Committee. "We're going to find out who made changes in the original statement. Until we do, I really think it's unwarranted to make accusations."

For days after the attack, top administration officials blamed the violence on protests against an anti-Muslim film. The attack killed the U.S. ambassador to the country and three other Americans.

But Gen. David Petraeus, the CIA director at the time, told lawmakers last Friday it was clear right from the start the Benghazi attack was carried out by terrorists.

Here's more from The Associated Press:

"Administration officials have defended the portrayal of the attack as relying on the best information available at the time that didn't compromise classified intelligence. Democrats say CIA and other intelligence officials signed off on the final talking points.

"Republicans have alleged a Watergate-like cover up, accusing White House aides of hiding the terrorism link in the run-up to the Nov. 6 presidential election so voters wouldn't question Obama's claim that al-Qaida's power had diminished."

Petraeus' closed-door testimony last week caused much consternation among lawmakers. As Eyder reported Friday on this blog, Rep. Peter King, R-N.Y., told Fox News that someone in the administration changed the talking points approved by the intelligence community in order to minimize the role terrorists played in the attack. Those talking points are the ones used by Susan Rice, the U.S. envoy to the U.N., who has come under attack for her comments in the wake of the Benghazi attack.

But a senior U.S. official familiar with the drafting of the talking points told NPR's Tom Gjelten last week the unclassified talking points were drafted by the CIA, and reflected "what it believed at that point in time."

As the AP reports, lawmakers who attended the Petraeus hearing said the former CIA chief said the reference to al-Qaida was removed from the final version of the talking points, though he wasn't sure which federal agency deleted it.

Sen. Olympia Snowe, R-Maine, who sits on the Senate Intelligence Committee, said she expects the panel to hold at least three more hearings on the matter.

"It took 17 days for the director of national intelligence even to issue a statement to say that it was a deliberate and organized terrorist attack," she said on CBS' Face the Nation. "That's unacceptable in today's environment."

Copyright 2012 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR

'F' Is For Fraudster In A Family Novel For Our Modern Times

Daniel Kehlmann's F, about three brothers abandoned by their father, examines the detail of lives lived without integrity. It is brilliantly translated from the German by Carol Brown Janeway.
NPR

No. 1 Most Expensive Coffee Comes From Elephant's No. 2

A coffee entrepreneur claims his brew is different — and better — than the trendy civet poop coffee. And it starts with the idea that elephants, unlike humans or civets, are herbivores.
WAMU 88.5

Maureen McDonnell Didn't Give Special Treatment To Star Scientific, Witness Testifies

A defense witness in the corruption trail against former Virginia Governor Bob McDonnell and his wife, Maureen, says the former first lady often traveled the state promoting state businesses, countering the notion she gave special treatment to the company at the heart of the corruption trial.
NPR

The Momentum Of The Ice Bucket Challenge — And What It Means For ALS

A recent fundraising challenge has gone viral on social media, calling attention to research into Lou Gehrig's disease. Forbes contributor Dan Diamond discusses the state of that research.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.