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Twinkies' Hostess Brand May Die, But The Iconic Snack Cakes Never Will

The Hostess brand, home of the Twinkie, Sno Ball, Ding Dong, and those fun cupcakes with the swirly lines on top and filling in the middle, is shutting down, as our colleagues over at The Two-Way blog report. The purveyor of iconic calorie-rich but nutrient-poor snacks says a labor dispute has forced it to go out of business.

According to Hostess CEO Gregory Rayburn, "We simply do not have the financial resources to survive an ongoing national strike." Although the company filed bankruptcy back in January, it seems that now it has reached the end of the Ho Ho's line.

Even if a white knight comes in to rescue the brand, (maybe the fictitious NASCAR driver Ricky Bobby, who is sponsored by Wonder Bread?) people are gonna be stocking up.

So in the interest of science, we thought we'd remind you of some of the cool things you can do with Twinkies, besides eat them, of course. Turns out, they don't break down in Mountain Dew. And, our own Adam Cole came up with these nine other uses:

Copyright 2012 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR

Not My Job: We Quiz Lena Headey On Games Worse Than 'Game Of Thrones'

Game of Thrones may have killed off many major characters, but the manipulative, scheming Queen Cersei is still standing. We've invited Headey to play a game called "You win and you die."
NPR

After Introducing Changes, Keurig Sales Continue To Fall

Despite America's high coffee consumption, Keurig reported disappointing sales this week. Even during its popular holiday selling period, the numbers haven't perked up in recent years.
NPR

Do Political TV Ads Still Work?

TV ads are a tried-and-true way for politicians to get their message out. But in this chaotic presidential primary, are they still effective?
NPR

Twitter Says It Has Shut Down 125,000 Terrorism-Related Accounts

The announcement comes just weeks after a woman sued Twitter, saying the platform knowingly let ISIS use the network "to spread propaganda, raise money and attract recruits."

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