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Twinkies' Hostess Brand May Die, But The Iconic Snack Cakes Never Will

The Hostess brand, home of the Twinkie, Sno Ball, Ding Dong, and those fun cupcakes with the swirly lines on top and filling in the middle, is shutting down, as our colleagues over at The Two-Way blog report. The purveyor of iconic calorie-rich but nutrient-poor snacks says a labor dispute has forced it to go out of business.

According to Hostess CEO Gregory Rayburn, "We simply do not have the financial resources to survive an ongoing national strike." Although the company filed bankruptcy back in January, it seems that now it has reached the end of the Ho Ho's line.

Even if a white knight comes in to rescue the brand, (maybe the fictitious NASCAR driver Ricky Bobby, who is sponsored by Wonder Bread?) people are gonna be stocking up.

So in the interest of science, we thought we'd remind you of some of the cool things you can do with Twinkies, besides eat them, of course. Turns out, they don't break down in Mountain Dew. And, our own Adam Cole came up with these nine other uses:

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Rapid Learners: How Pixar Animators Created A Very Scary River

What would a small dinosaur look like in Class V rapids? That's the question Pixar filmmakers had to answer for their film The Good Dinosaur. So they piled into a raft to figure it out for themselves.

We Tried A Futuristic Cranberry. It Was Fresh And Naturally Sweet

Cranberry breeders in Wisconsin have developed a berry that's tart but also sweet, like a Granny Smith apple. They say the variety isn't ready for production but could one day become a fresh product.

Russian Military Jet Crash Heightens Debate Over Syria No-Fly Zone

Hillary Clinton, Marco Rubio and others are supporting the idea of a no-fly zone over Syria to try to help civilians there. But skeptics say it no longer has any relevance to today's Syrian crisis.

Used Rocket Is A New Breakthrough For Blue Origin's Space Plan

Blue Origin, the space company founded by Amazon billionaire Jeff Bezos, has sent a craft past the edge of space and then landed its rocket safely – and vertically — in Texas.

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