Twinkies' Hostess Brand May Die, But The Iconic Snack Cakes Never Will | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Twinkies' Hostess Brand May Die, But The Iconic Snack Cakes Never Will

The Hostess brand, home of the Twinkie, Sno Ball, Ding Dong, and those fun cupcakes with the swirly lines on top and filling in the middle, is shutting down, as our colleagues over at The Two-Way blog report. The purveyor of iconic calorie-rich but nutrient-poor snacks says a labor dispute has forced it to go out of business.

According to Hostess CEO Gregory Rayburn, "We simply do not have the financial resources to survive an ongoing national strike." Although the company filed bankruptcy back in January, it seems that now it has reached the end of the Ho Ho's line.

Even if a white knight comes in to rescue the brand, (maybe the fictitious NASCAR driver Ricky Bobby, who is sponsored by Wonder Bread?) people are gonna be stocking up.

So in the interest of science, we thought we'd remind you of some of the cool things you can do with Twinkies, besides eat them, of course. Turns out, they don't break down in Mountain Dew. And, our own Adam Cole came up with these nine other uses:

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