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Twinkies' Hostess Brand May Die, But The Iconic Snack Cakes Never Will

The Hostess brand, home of the Twinkie, Sno Ball, Ding Dong, and those fun cupcakes with the swirly lines on top and filling in the middle, is shutting down, as our colleagues over at The Two-Way blog report. The purveyor of iconic calorie-rich but nutrient-poor snacks says a labor dispute has forced it to go out of business.

According to Hostess CEO Gregory Rayburn, "We simply do not have the financial resources to survive an ongoing national strike." Although the company filed bankruptcy back in January, it seems that now it has reached the end of the Ho Ho's line.

Even if a white knight comes in to rescue the brand, (maybe the fictitious NASCAR driver Ricky Bobby, who is sponsored by Wonder Bread?) people are gonna be stocking up.

So in the interest of science, we thought we'd remind you of some of the cool things you can do with Twinkies, besides eat them, of course. Turns out, they don't break down in Mountain Dew. And, our own Adam Cole came up with these nine other uses:

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He Died At 32, But A Young Artist Lives On In LA's Underground Museum

When Noah Davis founded the museum, he wanted to bring world-class art to a neighborhood he likened to a food desert, meaning no grocery stores or museums. Davis died a year ago Monday.
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The Strange, Twisted Story Behind Seattle's Blackberries

Those tangled brambles are everywhere in the city, the legacy of an eccentric named Luther Burbank whose breeding experiments with crops can still be found on many American dinner plates.
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Trump Surrogate Tweets Cartoon Of Hillary Clinton In Blackface

Pastor Mark Burns mocked Hillary Clinton with a cartoon that read, in part, "I ain't no ways tired of pandering to African Americans."
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Listen: 'Web Site Story,' NPR's Musical About The Internet — From 1999

Found in our archives: an Internet-themed remake of West Side Story from the dot-com bubble era. It begins with Bill Gates and features the sound of a modem but isn't as obsolete as you might expect.

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