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'Call Of Duty: Black Ops II' Sells $500 Million In First 24 Hours

Here's a big number for you today: $500 million.

That's how much the latest installment of the "Call Of Duty" video game, "Black Ops II," raked in the 24 hours following its release.

"With first day sales of over half a billion dollars worldwide, we believe Call of Duty is the biggest entertainment launch of the year for the fourth year in a row," Bobby Kotick, CEO, Activision Blizzard, said in a statement. "Life-to-date sales for the Call of Duty franchise have exceeded worldwide theatrical box office receipts for Harry Potter and Star Wars, the two most successful movie franchises of all time."

The Los Angeles Times reports the previous installment, "Call Of Duty: Modern Warfare 3" grossed $400 million its first day. So, while the number may seem eye-popping don't be fooled, analyst Evan Wilson told the Times.

The paper reports:

"Wilson also noted that 'Modern Warfare 3' grossed $775 million globally in its first five days and called that 'the number to watch' in terms of a direct comparison for 'Black Ops II.'

"While it undoubtedly remains one of the most popular and profitable brands in the video game industry, analysts have been worried that Activision's annual 'Call of Duty' installments have been starting to lose sales momentum. Some analysts said that after a bigger start, 'Modern Warfare 3' sold less than 2010 entry 'Call of Duty: Black Ops.'"

Copyright 2012 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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