WAMU 88.5 : News

Filed Under:

Three Nobel Laureates Back Pfc. Manning As Wikileaks Case Unfolds

Play associated audio
PFC Bradley Manning in the most recent Department of Army photo.
United States Army
PFC Bradley Manning in the most recent Department of Army photo.

Three Nobel Peace Prize winners are weighing in on the Wikileaks case unfolding at Ft. Meade in Maryland. They are supporting U.S. Army private Bradley Manning, who is being facing court-martial for allegedly sending classified information to the website.

The three Nobel laureates — Desmond Tutu, Mairead Corrigan Maguire and Adolfo Perez Esquivel — signed a letter in The Nation magazine, calling Pfc. Manning a courageous whistle-blower. 

The authors say Manning's alleged actions gave the world unparallelled access to important facts. They argue that he changed the world for the better, and they urge Americans to support Manning.

The letter comes a week after Manning's lawyers revealed an offer to plead guilty to reduced charges. Under the terms of the offer, Manning would acknowledge sending Wikileaks hundreds of thousands of classified documents, but he would not plead guilty to violating federal espionage and computer laws, or to aiding the enemy, which carries a maximum life sentence.

Manning has been detained since he was arrested in Iraq in May 2010.

NPR

On Television, More Transgender Characters Come Into Focus

Now that it's more common to see gay characters on TV, is the medium turning to transgender people for fresh stories? NPR's Neda Ulaby looks at TV's crop of transgender and "gender fluid" characters.
NPR

Obama Gets A Taste Of Jiro's 'Dream' Sushi In Name Of Diplomacy

On the first leg of his Asian tour, the president stopped by the iconic sushi restaurant. David Gelb, who directed a documentary about the restaurant, says eating there is amazing and nerve-wracking.
NPR

Pennsylvania Congresswoman Goes All In For Obamacare

Does Rep. Allyson Schwartz's pro-Affordable Care Act television ad signal a new thinking among Democrats running in statewide races?
NPR

FCC To Propose Change To Net Neutrality Rules, Media Report

The FCC is expected to put out new Internet traffic rules that would let content providers negotiate for better service. NPR's Melissa Block talks with Wall Street Journal reporter Gautham Nagesh.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.