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George Washington University Stripped Of U.S. News Ranking

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George Washington University is no longer ranked as one of the top schools in the nation by U.S. News and World Report.

The school's coveted 51st ranking is being removed, because the admissions office overstated the percentage of incoming freshman in the top 10 percent of their high school class.

U.S. News says George Washington will have an "unranked'' status until colleges are ranked again in the fall, and the school confirms the accuracy of its data.

"I'm a senior, a lot of my friends are in the senior class, getting ready to graduate, getting ready to apply to grad school," says Hugo Scheckter. "It's certainly not what we need in an already tough job market."

Scheckter is a senator in the University's student association, and is calling an emergency meeting, asking school officials to address students' concerns.

Michael Buss is a junior and has also been involved with the student association. He says most students are overreacting.

"There's status' on Facebook of 'our degree is worthless' or 'our degree is on par with the University of Phoenix' and I think that that's a load of nonsense," says Buss.

George Washington University President Steven Knapp says he's surprised by the decision to remove the University's ranking from the U.S. News list, rather than correct the mistake.


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