TSA Pushes PreCheck Program Before Holiday Rush | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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TSA Pushes PreCheck Program Before Holiday Rush

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Participants in the TSA PreCheck program get through screening more quickly and are afforded the ability to keep on their shoes.
Wayan Vota: http://www.flickr.com/photos/dcmetroblogger/7830394298/
Participants in the TSA PreCheck program get through screening more quickly and are afforded the ability to keep on their shoes.

The Transportation Security Administration says it's doing everything it can to make holiday travel easier, but it says travelers must also play a part.

The TSA has now implemented TSA PreCheck, an expedited prescreening initiative for known travelers and active duty service members. They've also modified procedures for screening passengers 12 and under, 75 and over, and airline crew members. The group hopes this will reduce, although not eliminate, the need for a pat-down.

They're also reminding you that if you're traveling this holiday season, wrapped packages may need to be unwrapped before security screening. Food items like cake and pie are allowed, but may also require additional inspection.

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