Lee MacPhail, Half Of Only Father-Son Duo In Baseball Hall Of Fame, Dies | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

NPR : News

Filed Under:

Lee MacPhail, Half Of Only Father-Son Duo In Baseball Hall Of Fame, Dies

Former American League President Lee MacPhail, who as a baseball executive with the New York Yankees and Baltimore Orioles helped build World Series champions, has died. He was 95.

MacPhail had been the oldest living member of the National Baseball Hall of Fame and was the younger half of the only father-son duo in the hall. His father, Larry MacPhail, was also a baseball executive and was the man credited with bringing night games to the majors — in 1935 at Cincinnati's Crosley Field.

Lee MacPhail, according to the Hall of Fame, "passed away peacefully on Thursday evening of natural causes at his home in Delray Beach, Fla." With his death, former Boston Red Sox second baseman Bobby Doerr is now the oldest living member of the Hall. Doerr, born April 7, 1918, is 94.

Lee MacPhail's Hall of Fame plaque reads:

"One of the leading executives in baseball history, his name is synonymous with integrity and sportsmanship. As farm director and player personnel director of the Yankees (1949-58), helped build a system which yielded seven world championships. As Orioles general manager (1959-65), helped lay the groundwork for one of the game's most consistently successful franchises; and he later rejoined the Yankees in the same capacity. Served admirably as American League president (1974-83) before concluding his 45-year career as president of the Player Relations Committee. He and his father Larry form the first father son tandem in the Hall of Fame."

Copyright 2012 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR

No Small Feat: The NBA's Shortest Player Never Gave Up

At 5 foot 3, Muggsy Bogues holds the record as shortest player in NBA history. Criticism of his height started on the basketball courts of the Baltimore projects, and continued well into his career.
NPR

Tracing A Gin-Soaked Trail In London

Around the world, new gin distilleries are popping up like mushrooms after a rain. NPR traces the boom to its historic roots in London, which once had 250 distilleries within the city limits alone.
NPR

Ranting And Throwing Papers: An Angry Candidate Runs For Congress

State Rep. Mike Bost's rants on the Illinois House floor are the stuff viral dreams are made of. Bost says he has good reason to be upset, and wants voters to share his anger.
NPR

Israel's Solar-Powered 'Trees': For Smartphones And Community

The man-made trees are designed to create a public space where people can gather and re-charge a battery — their own and their smartphone's.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.