Tell Us: Why Did Obama Win? | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

NPR : News

Filed Under:

Tell Us: Why Did Obama Win?

Play associated audio

Two-Way readers were pretty smart about when we would hear who won the White House.

It was 11:29 p.m. ET last night when we posted the news that "Obama wins."

And:

"Between 10 p.m. ET and midnight Tuesday" was the most popular choice by the 13,801 readers who answered our "when will we know who won?" question. It was picked by 32.2 percent.

So, we want to see what you smart folks think about "why" the president was re-elected. We can't list all the reasons in one question, but we can offer some choices. Feel free to suggest more in the comments thread.

For one expert's thoughts on what the exit polls say about voters' attitudes, check Morning Edition's conversation with Michael Dimock of the Pew Research Center.

He points out that "the electorate this year looked a lot like the electorate in 2008" and that the president was able to again turn out his female and minority supporters.

Reminder: Questions like the one in this post are not scientific surveys of public opinion. They're just questions.
Copyright 2012 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR

Tracy Morgan Sues Wal-Mart Over Truck-Limousine Crash

The comedian and television star of "Saturday Night Live" and "30 Rock" alleges negligence on the part of the retail giant, whose driver was exceeding the speed limit.
NPR

What If The World Cup Were Awarded For Saving Trees And Drinking Soda?

We thought you'd get a kick out of seeing how the four teams in the final World Cup matches stack up in global health and development.
NPR

What Could $100 Million Buy You — Besides Campaign Ads In Kentucky?

Spending on the Kentucky Senate race might reach $100 million. So what else could that get you in the Bluegrass State? NPR's Tamara Keith finds out when she calls up some local business owners.
NPR

Switzerland: From Banking Paradise To Data Safe Zone

Swiss vaults have held treasures ranging from Nazi gold to Wall Street fortunes. Now they're becoming the guardians of the 21st century's most precious asset: digital information.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.