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O'Malley: Don't Count On Polls, Get Out To Vote

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With less than 24 hours before the polls open, supporters of same-sex marriage in Maryland are making their last pitch.

Polls show voters in Maryland are poised to become the first voters in the country to uphold same-sex marriage via a ballot referendum.

Gov. Martin O'Malley urged voters not to be complacent. The governor urged those who had not yet voiced support for Question 6 on the ballot to do so this evening or at the polls Tuesday.

He also referenced Question 4, which deals with the DREAM Act. It would allow undocumented students to get in-state tuition rates at schools like College Park. Polls show Maryland voters will pass that question by an even greater margin than the same-sex marriage question, but at an earlier rally in Takoma Park, county executive Isiah Leggett urged supporters not to count on those polls and vote Tuesday.

Less clear is the fate of Question 7, which would expand gaming in the state. Record levels of money have been spent trying to sway voters on that issue, and the governor headed a rally earlier Monday in Baltimore asking voters to pass that issue.

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