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Alligator Seized In Anne Arundel Drug Arrest

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Smaller American alligators are still quite capable of taking off fingers.
http://www.flickr.com/photos/tambako/6800773262/
Smaller American alligators are still quite capable of taking off fingers.

Anne Arundel County police executing a warrant got more than they expected at a house in Jessup, Md.

The search and seizure warrant was the result of an Anne Arundel County Police Narcotics team investigation into alleged drug trafficking at the house at 7506 Gleneagle Dr.

Inside the residence, officers found 159 grams of marijuana with an estimated street value of more than $3,100, assorted drug paraphernalia, nearly $800 in cash, and some unknown substances sent to the county's crime lab for analysis.

Police also found a 3-foot American alligator. Maryland state law makes it a misdemeanor for private residents to possess an alligator.

Animal Control officer took the reptile, apparently in good health, to a facility for exotic animals.

Michael Bolden, 32, was charged with possession of marijuana with intent to distribute. A police spokesman says evidence inside the house confirms Bolden is a member of an area street gang known as the Dead Man Incorporated gang.

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