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Million Puppet March Draws Hundreds To Support Public Broadcasting

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Several hundred people rallied in front of the Capitol Saturday, Nov. 3 for the Million Puppet March.
Ashley Dejean
Several hundred people rallied in front of the Capitol Saturday, Nov. 3 for the Million Puppet March.

Several hundred people, some dressed up as Sesame Street characters, such as Big Bird and Oscar the Grouch, rallied in front of the Capitol Saturday for the Million Puppet March, a demonstration held in support of public broadcasting.

The march came three days before the election. Organizers of the Million Puppet March say they're concerned because during the first presidential debate, Gov. Mitt Romney said he would cut spending to PBS to reduce the deficit.

"We're here to support PBS and get the word out that public television and Sesame Street if you will, is a good thing to have around," says Michael Schupbach, a professional puppet maker who got his start building puppets for Sesame Street. "It's such a small investment that results in something that's so positive."

John Lamoreaux says there's an educational benefit to public broadcasting. "A lot of children, such as myself grew up learning a lot basic skills from that in a fun way. I like the idea that you don't have to afford TV or broadcasting. You can actually just turn it on, and get some free education."

Several attendees and puppeteers, such as Adam Hiller, brought their own puppets.

"This is the first time I've ever gotten involved in any kind of politics," says Hiller. "I wanted to make sure they protected the funding for PBS, and when else can you get involved in a political rally that involves puppets?"

The rally included puppet shows, speeches, and even a love song to Terry Gross, the host of Fresh Air.

Photos: Million Puppet March

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