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D.C. Lowers Fines For Speed Camera Tickets

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D.C. is lowering fine for some speeders in the District.
D.C. is lowering fine for some speeders in the District.

Lawmakers are making changes to the fines doled out by automated speed cameras.

Under the new system, anyone caught going up to 10 miles per hour over the speed limit will be fined $50 instead of the current $75 fine. Drivers caught going 11 to 15 miles over the speed limit will be fined $100 rather than the current $125. Real speed demons will have to shell out much more for violations now, however. Drivers caught going more than 25 mph over the limit will pay a higher fine: $300 instead of the current $250.

D.C. Mayor Vincent Gray altered the structure amid growing debate over D.C.'s automated traffic enforcement program, and whether its driven more by revenue concerns than public safety. The District's traffic camera operation yielded nearly $90 million this past fiscal year. The program — which police and pedestrian safety advocates say has helped drive down traffic-related fatalities — has also faced criticism for its costly tickets. 

As part of the changes, some of the traffic camera revenue will now be used to hire an additional 100 police officers. The new fines will only affect speed camera tickets; red light camera fines remain the same. 

The changes are similar to ones proposed in legislation introduced last month in the D.C. Council.

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