Sandy's Damage Under The Sea, Through The Eyes Of Oyster Farmers | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Sandy's Damage Under The Sea, Through The Eyes Of Oyster Farmers

Connecticut Gov. Dannel Malloy wrapped up a post Hurricane Sandy news briefing earlier this week by talking about sewage discharges into Long Island Sound. "Suffice to say in the immediate time being, no one should eat the clams or oysters," he said.

That's right. Because of water quality issues, the state put a temporary stop to oyster farming, but that's usually a short-term thing and it happens fairly regularly after a big storm.

But Hurricane Sandy may have had a far more lasting impact on some in the oyster industry in terms of pure destruction of the oyster's fragile habitat.

Norman Bloom and his son, Jimmy Bloom are oyster farmers at Norm Bloom and Son in Norwalk, Conn. Their family has been raising oysters for three generations now on 2,000 underwater acres of oysters in Long Island Sound. And, on Wednesday, two days after the storm, I tagged along as the Blooms were finally able to get out on the water to assess the damage.

Check out the slideshow above to see what they found.

Cohen is a reporter with WNPR in Connecticut.

Copyright 2012 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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