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Consumer Confidence Hits Highest Point In Nearly Five Years

By at least one measure, in October consumers were the most confident they've been since February 2008, the private Conference Board reports.

Its widely watched consumer confidence index rose to 72.2 from 68.4 in September. According to a statement from the board's director of economic indicators, Lynn Franco, "consumers were considerably more positive in their assessment of current conditions, with improvements in the job market as the major driver. Consumers were modestly more upbeat about their financial situation and the short-term economic outlook, and appear to be in better spirits approaching the holiday season."

Since consumers purchase about 70 percent of all goods and services, their mood is a key economic indicator.

This news follows the morning's other major economic indicators, which included word that private payrolls may have increased last month by about 158,000 jobs.

Copyright 2012 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR

'The Innocent Have Nothing To Fear' Echoes Real-Life Republican Race

NPR's Ari Shapiro talks with Stuart Stevens, a former strategist for Mitt Romney, whose new novel, The Innocent Have Nothing to Fear, tells the story of a neck-and-neck Republican primary campaign that ends up at a brokered convention.
WAMU 88.5

How History Influences Diets In D.C. And Around The World

Kojo and chef Pati Jinich look at how history -- and famous names like El Chico, Azteca and even Fritos -- shaped modern Mexican-American cooking in the Washington region and beyond.

WAMU 88.5

Implications Of The Supreme Court's Immigration Ruling

Many undocumented immigrants are living in fear after a Supreme Court ruling effectively barred deferred deportation for 4 million people. What the ruling means for families across the country and how immigration policy is playing out in 2016 election politics.

NPR

Virtual Reality Aimed At The Elderly Finds New Fans

Some doctors are finding that virtual travel — to Venice, a Hawaiian beach or Africa — can open new worlds to people confined by low mobility, dementia, or depression.

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