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Hurricane Sandy Slows Down Presidential Campaigning

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A lone man wearing a rain pouch walks past the White House in Washington, Monday, Oct. 29,2012, during the approach of Hurricane Sandy.
(AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
A lone man wearing a rain pouch walks past the White House in Washington, Monday, Oct. 29,2012, during the approach of Hurricane Sandy.

Early voting has been suspended in Maryland and in D.C., and a debate between Maryland U.S. Senate candidates scheduled for tomorrow has been canceled as well.

Hurricanes have funny relationships with politics, and the hurricanes always win. In 2008, and then again this year, Republicans had to cancel a day of their presidential convention because they didn't want to be seen celebrating while nasty storms threatened lives. Now both parties are contending with Hurricane Sandy.

Over the weekend, both Mitt Romney and Vice President Biden canceled rallies in Virginia, while President Obama canceled an event in Prince William County, Va. that was scheduled for today. However, hundreds of Obama for America volunteers did come out to canvass neighborhoods on Sunday.

As the campaigns wait to see what the storm brings, Obama Campaign volunteer Aimee Burgoyne says the McLean headquarters is prepared.

"Well, I know we've got flashlights and batteries and things like that already stockpiled in the back, so we're ready," she says. "We are going to keep going everyday. The storm's not going to change things here."

This week, the Romney campaign is using its Virginia offices to collect supplies to turn over to storm relief centers, and it's continuing its get out the vote efforts — weather permitting. Both campaigns are hoping to reschedule their Virginia events as the 2012 election enters its final days.

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