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Sandy Could Be Strongest Storm Ever To Hit East Coast

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Heavy rain in downtown Ocean City Sunday morning, Oct. 28, 2012.
Bryan Russo
Heavy rain in downtown Ocean City Sunday morning, Oct. 28, 2012.

Hurricane Sandy isn't just getting closer to our region, the latest reports from the National Hurricane Center say she's getting stronger, and is shaping up to be the unprecedented storm forecasters feared.

Sandy is now the strongest storm in history, as her integrated kinetic energy or IKE is more than infamous storms like Katrina, Andrew, Hugo, and Ike.

Sandy's impacts for tropical storm force winds are projected to be 522 miles, meaning millions of people from Wallops Island Virginia to New York City could feel historical impacts on Monday when Sandy makes landfall somewhere near the Tom's River, New Jersey, as all global models are predicting.

On the Delmarva Peninsula, coastal residents are evacuating in three Delaware counties, and Ocean City, Maryland could follow suit with their own evacuation in the coming hours.

Rain has already started to fall Sunday, with winds are picking up, and the ocean already looks much angrier than it did during Hurricane Irene.

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