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Mandatory Evacuation For Ocean City Residents

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Ocean City officials have implemented a mandatory evacuation for residents living in downtown.
Bryan Russo
Ocean City officials have implemented a mandatory evacuation for residents living in downtown.

Ocean City officials are enacting phase 2 of their emergency operations plan, which means all residents who live downtown must evacuate the resort by 8 p.m. Sunday.

Mayor Rick Meehan has declared a state of emergency as the city is already starting to see rising waters and flooding in the low lying areas of downtown Ocean City.

All residents who live south of 17th Street must evacuate, and there is a voluntarily evacuation in play for the rest of the resort.

The beaches are now closed, and the inlet parking lot will be shut down at 5 p.m, and will not open again for the duration of the storm.

As a result of this action by the town, Worcester County will open emergency shelters at 1 p.m. today, and Ocean City's transportation department will be shuttling residents in need via city buses starting also at 1 p.m. Residents who need a ride off the island should go to the Roland E Powell Convention Center on 41st Street.

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